It was only a matter of time before the unwanted AstraZeneca vaccine made it’s way to Kosovo.

Austria was the first European country to sound the alarm regarding potential blood clots caused by the AstraZeneca vaccine while Denmark became the first one to suspend its use outright.

It was swiftly followed by others such as Norway and Ireland before some of Europe’s largest economies also announced their own suspensions. Germany, France and Italy said they were halting use of the vaccine yesterday while several countries outside of Europe have also announced their own suspensions or halted rollout plans including Thailand, Indonesia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Venezuela. British-Swedish pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca has strongly defended its vaccine, stating that there is no link to increased risk of fatal brain hemorrhages and blood clots.

The Financial Times writes:

Spain and Italy have moved to limit the use of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine to people aged above 60, in shifts that will complicate the countries’ efforts to step up their vaccination programmes. 

The decisions by Madrid and Rome on Wednesday night came after the European Medicines Agency said earlier in the day that there was a link between very rare blood clots in the brain and the AstraZeneca jab.

Belgium separately restricted the AstraZeneca vaccine to those aged 56 or older for a minimum of four weeks on Wednesday. Australia moved on Thursday to limit further use of the shot in those younger than 50, with Canberra saying the BioNTech/Pfizer inoculation should be used instead.

France and Germany had also previously restricted the use of the shot for the over-55s and over-60s, respectively — trusting that other vaccines, such as that from BioNTech/Pfizer and a new one-shot inoculation from Johnson & Johnson, will be sufficient to make up the lag in the EU’s vaccination programme.

The UK, which is well ahead of the EU in the vaccine rollout, abruptly changed its guidance over the AstraZeneca vaccine on Wednesday, recommending that people aged between 18 and 29 are offered alternative jabs. Sweden and Finland allow its use only in the over-65s, while Denmark and Norway have suspended its use until at least next week.

Spain’s decision to use the AstraZeneca vaccine only for people over 60 reverses the country’s policy of just a few weeks ago — until last month it banned the use of the jab for those over 55.

  • UK: Under-30s should be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca jab
  • Spain and Italy: Limit to use in those over 60
  • Belgium: Use suspended in people under 56 for the next four weeks
  • France and Canada: Restricted to use in over-55s
  • Germany: Recommended only for those over 60
  • Sweden and Finland: Used only for over-65s
  • Denmark and Norway: Use suspended in all age groups until at least next week
  • Australia: Avoid further use on under-50s

Last week the UK government revealed there had been 30 severe blood clotting cases reported out of 15.8 million administered doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, leading to seven deaths.

A trial of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine in children and teens has been put on hold while the UK’s drug regulator investigates a possible link between the jab and rare blood clots in adults.

The University of Oxford has halted the paediatric trials of its vaccine, developed in collaboration with pharma giant AstraZeneca, after the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) launched a probe into the potential connection with the jab.

Kosovo not only accepted the vaccine that nobody wants, it put in a curfew to be able to use it, as the un-tested vaccine is has only been given permission to be used in cases of emergency. So even though cases in Kosovo have been going down. Everyone has to suffer so they can give out this so called vaccine, which is a risk to over 60s and under 60s, depending on who you listen to.

If closing bars and restaurants were spreading the virus, there would have been a spike as soon as they re-opened, which there wasn’t.

The majority in the bar I frequent, have had the virus, with little or no symptoms, the worse was a persistent headache. I am not speaking about a bar that is full of 20yr olds, but a bar that has all ages, mainly 40s, 60s, 70s and even 80s, with nearly all now have antibodies. So if this is a cross section at the top end of the age group, then all of the bars and restaurants in the younger age groups must also have antibodies.

Making the situation in Kosovo look far worse than it actually is, not only puts people out of work, but puts Kosovo on the red list for travel, by other countries.

JLC/FOK

 

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